Tag Archives | CEDR training

The meadows of mediation, an oasis for our communities

I just came back from two days at CEDR’s International Trainers’ Network training, and it was fantastic. I wanted to share with you the feeling of this session, but it’s hard to put word on all that we have shared. Perhaps if I can use an analogy I would say that mediation has an amazing […]

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Summer School 2014 – A rich learning experience!

I am writing this post having just finished being one of the lead trainers of this year’s CEDR International Mediator Skills Summer School which this year was held near Lisbon, in Portugal. One of the key reasons behind summer school is to attract a range of participants from different countries. This year we had delegates […]

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Not engaging with commercial conflict: Alicante, Kigali, Tbilisi

Last month was a busy one spent working on three very diverse projects in different parts of the world. On reflection it is interesting that all three projects in part involved the same issue: how to get those in conflict to engage in the resolution of their own conflicts rather than avoiding it or giving […]

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Mediation and the land of Genghis Khan

Mongolia is often regarded as synonymous with remoteness and in the case of its infamous 12 century ruler, Genghis Khan, for barbarism, brutality and authoritarian control.  These are both myths, as I discovered when training mediators for the Centre for Effective Dispute Resolution (“CEDR”) in Ulan Bator, Mongolia’s capital city, at the beginning of April. […]

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Adult Learning: Unconscious incompetence to conscious excellence?

CEDR’s mission is to inspire business to use mediation when managing and resolving disputes.  A large part of this is ensuring that mediators are trained to a standard of excellence.  Understanding how adults learn is key to learning transfer, skill acquisition and ultimately effective mediation training.  Adults learn better by doing rather than just seeing […]

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