Negotiating in the moment

How prepared are you for tough and dynamic negotiation? Do you have the skills necessary to negotiate in the moment and face the unexpected?

“Under pressure, you don’t rise to the occasion, you sink to the level of your training. That’s why we train so hard.” – US Navy Seals

Most of us have already heard this quote attributed to the US Navy Seals. Although we generally agree on its military origin, it represents a more general and very real human reaction. Pressure generates emotions and stress, and we make decisions without thinking through as we should. And this is most true at a negotiation table. Whether you are negotiating a letting agreement, the price of a car, a business contract with a client or the exit of your country from the EU, there will come a time where pressure will be used in an attempt to influence the balance. Whether you are well prepared or not for the negotiation, this is the point where many, even highly experienced negotiators, will “sink” to the level of their training.

Having a good foundation in the skills, process and preparation needed to be an effective negotiator is crucial for any professional facing these types of situation. When uncertain circumstances arise, or pressures are applied whilst negotiating, only those well trained are able to have good outcomes and feel confident to deal with the unexpected. By being familiar with the negotiation process, but also with situations of pressure, and being able to prepare in advance for this type of situation leads to better negotiated outcomes, and avoid deadlock or buyer’s regret.

What you can do.

For this purpose, two of CEDR’s most experienced negotiation training practitioners have set up a Negotiation boot camp to help professionals to “Negotiate better in the moment”. With a combined experience of over 60 years as negotiators and mediators, Felicity Steadman and Chula Rupasinha have cut their teeth on intense industrial relations crisis scenarios. They have learned, sometimes the hard way, what works in high-consequence and dynamic negotiations and are now joining forces to offer those skills to business professionals in London.

Chula : A former senior crisis negotiator and Superintendent with the London Metropolitan Police. He now mediates a broad range of commercial and workplace disputes.

Felicity : A full-time mediator of commercial disputes, as well as workplace and labour disputes, and trainer in conflict management. She commenced her practice in 1989 in South Africa with the Independent Mediation Service of South Africa.

This course will focus on our own personal preparedness for tough negotiations. This boot camp will challenge your habits as a negotiator and allow you to go back to basics and prepare for your next dynamic negotiation. Our trainers will stress test your negotiation skills to develop your ability to negotiate better “in the moment”. By topping-up and refreshing your negotiation skills, you will also receive one-to-one coaching throughout the day to help you reflect and adapt.

Refresh and reboot your negotiation skills for 2017 to enable you to deliver your objectives!

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One Response to Negotiating in the moment

  1. John Lee 07/12/2016 at 15:18 #

    I was curious about the idea you pose of sinking to the level of your training, particularly when things get tough. I’ve yet to experience a mediation (or negotiation) training that would match the intensity of the training I imagine a soldier would be required to go through.

    I think we do draw upon the things we learn in a formal context like training, but in the absence of that kind of intense training I think we default to habits and patterns of thinking that are formed way before we enter a training room. – that’s what the research tells us anyway.

    Greg Rooney, an accomplished mediator and academic talks about mediating some pretty intense cases and refers to his style of “Mediating in the Moment” in this short video clip.

    Hope it’s useful.
    Thanks
    John

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